Peta Dzubiel – Across Time and Place

Across Time and Place

Depot II Gallery 2013

This solo exhibition stems from a Bundanon Trust Artists’ residency during the entire month of November last year. The paintings focus on the property, its vastness, beauty and skies that seek to envelop one in its weather. In addition to the landscapes, figurative paintings that feature artefacts and the memory and absence of people assist the development of potential narratives. Internal and external figure/field relationships are a means by which I can express the psychological and metaphysical aspects of ‘Landscape’.

My current painting practice explores the tradition of landscape with a focus on the temporal; the idea that places remember their past whilst always being at the mercy of human intervention and other forces of change.

My paintings work with elements of pictorial ambiguity and mystery to explore these themes, perhaps evoking a bygone era, but remaining contemporary through the use of a variety of materials, processes and the deployment of discontinuous space.

Peta Dzubiel, 2013

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Thank you to the Bundanon Trust and artists’ residency team.

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WITH THANKS TO

Kathryn Joergensen

Chelsea Lehmann

David Palmer

Wendy & Peter Dzubiel

Kim Pearce

Kath Fries

Sylvia Tuz Photography

Mark Leaver

Rachel Carroll

Lee Stone

Eve Patterson

The art shop Mona vale

www.theartshopmonavale.com

Upcoming exhibition: ‘Across Time and Place’ 8-20 July at Depot II Gallery Danks St Waterloo, Sydney. Opening night Wednesday 10th of July 6-8pm.

Across Time and Place

This solo exhibition stems from a Bundanon Trust Artists’ residency during the entire month of November last year. The paintings focus on the property, its vastness, beauty and skies that seek to envelop one in its weather. In addition to the landscapes, figurative paintings that feature artefacts and the memory and absence of people assist the development of potential narratives. Internal and external figure/field relationships are a means by which I can express the psychological and metaphysical aspects of ‘Landscape’.

My current painting practice explores the tradition of landscape with a focus on the temporal; the idea that places remember their past whilst always being at the mercy of human intervention and other forces of change.

My paintings work with elements of pictorial ambiguity and mystery to explore these themes, perhaps evoking a bygone era, but remaining contemporary through the use of a variety of materials, processes and the deployment of discontinuous space.

                                                                                                            Peta Dzubiel, 2013

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An Australian Gothic

An Australian Gothic

For some time, I have been interested in film, literature and art which oscillate around the notion of the Australian Gothic. I feel my paintings always display aspects of this and I am aware it is something I try and tap into. My paintings endeavour to combine elements of Romanticism and the Gothic mode to conjure up an unsettling beauty and intrigue. Recently I have been drawn to the stories and environments of people in historical photographs which feature early Australians, pioneers and immigrants. These photographic records, I find, have an aesthetic that evokes imagination and reinterpretation via painterly exploration.

From its inception the Gothic has dealt with fears and themes which are endemic in the colonial experience: isolation, entrapment, fear of pursuit and fear of the unknown. And for each, the possibility of transformation, of surviving the dislocation, acts as a driving hope. 

–          Gerry Turcotte, ‘Australian Gothic’, 1998

This painting features father and daughter, Kenneth and Helen McKenzie and their prized horse. The McKenzies, originally from Scotland, lived and farmed the property at Bundanon for four generations. Tragedy struck on the eve of the Nowra show when Kenneth and Helen drowned while washing their horse in the river. The Jacaranda tree by the Bundanon homestead was planted in their memory.

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In the Studio

In this House, oil on canvas on board 20 x 25.5cm

In the studio I have been painting small and large Bundanon landscapes and exploring figurative ideas derived from historical photographs and stories from the Shoalhaven region.

From a visit to historical Meroogal House Nowra, I became intrigued by a photograph of Margaret Ross Macgregor as a young girl. In the photograph, she is wearing mariner shell necklaces, which were made by Aboriginal women and the particular necklaces Margaret is wearing in the photograph have been identified as Tasmanian. These necklaces were regarded as jewellery for children and so it is likely that they were given to Margaret Macgregor as a gift. She married a Presbyterian minister with whom she had a daughter. She later divorced her minister husband and raised her daughter at Meroogal House with her sisters. To do this during her time would have caused conversation in the town as divorce was rather taboo, especially from a man of the cloth. Apparently Margaret Macgregor’s reputation held up.

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http://www.hht.net.au/museums/meroogal

Potted Landscape

Copper Pot For a Friend

Several months ago my dear friend and artist, Chelsea Lehmann, gave me a little copper pot so I could experience painting on a surface that she had enjoyed working with. I rediscovered the little pot in the studio and decided to paint a tiny landscape for her. The oil paint moved smoothly on the copper and allowed for impasto and lighter brushwork so the copper can shine through when caught in the light.

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Week four at Bundanon

Tears. Leaving Bundanon and the Shoalhaven with a heavy heart after what has been a wonderful month. My art practice feels invigorated and strong.

The last week at Bundanon I spent mostly sketching and drawing and enjoying the property and the magnificent feeling of simply being there. It is amazing how after a few weeks new scenes or interesting aspects of the property reveal themselves to you for artistic exploration; a second stage of seeing. I chose to mostly draw and do things in the studio that didn’t involve oil paint, mainly for practical reasons because transporting wet paintings back to Sydney wouldn’t be fun. Soft pastel was the drawing medium of choice for its immediacy and the application of colour to show form and contrast quickly.

The residency at Bundanon has honestly been productive and thought provoking. I came to Bundanon with set ideas of what I would do and to some extent I have achieved this. However, I was not expecting to leave with the abundance of research, references and multiple lines of inquiry I now have to work with for the next few years at least. I also didn’t expect to connect as strongly as I did with the fellow artists in residence. It was so refreshing to meet artists willing to let you share in their creative process and see their work unfold and develop.

Special thanks to fellow AIR’s Kath Fries, Julie Bradley, Amy Walsh, Christa Hughes, Candy Royalle, Paula Tierney and my house mate Flossie Peitsch and amazing musician/composer Christina Green.

Big thanks to the staff and Trust of Bundanon that run and provide such a professional and supportive residency program. Thankyou for being so inclusive and approachable, all of you, you’re wonderful.

Special Thanks to Regina Heilmann – Arts Program Manager, Deborah Ely – CEO, Jen Thompson – Collections and Exhibitions Manager, Onni  Namek– Housekeeper, Gary Hogan –Caretaker and Henry Goodall – Property Manager (thanks for the chats and sharing your knowledge of the property).

A Super Big thankyou to Arthur and Yvonne Boyd for giving this epic gift to Australia.

BUNDANON FOREVER!

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After Boyd’s painting, ‘Narcissus’, 1976

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