PETA DZUBIEL – ARCADIA 1-11 April 2015

Peta Dzubiel ARCADIA 1-11 April 2015 @ Sheffer Gallery 38 Lander Street Darlington

Arcadia This exhibition of paintings seeks to re-imagine the idea of Arcadia in the Australian landscape.  Arcadia is a term derived from the Ancient Greek conception of paradise or place of rustic beauty. The phrase, ‘Et in Arcadia Ego’, roughly translates as meaning – Even in Arcadia, there am I. However, even in paradise, behind the beautiful and the inspiring can be tragedy or the deeply unsettling. This notion befits the vast and isolating beauty of the Australian landscape that has beguiled and transfixed many to dream and explore its shores and plains. The paintings make direct reference to narratives that focus on the notion of being ‘lost’ either to a place or by misadventure.  Peter Weir’s adaptation of Picnic at Hanging Rock and The Audrey’s song, Little Molly, have been the basis for many of the paintings and influenced the direction of the series. Both references have a psychological connection to landscape and conjure imagery of people ‘lost’, whether in a physical or emotional sense, in a place of beauty within the Australian Landscape. The River, which features strongly in this series, can both intrigue and transfix in its transience and in turn, it is this pull that has led the river to be the setting for many narratives.

Peta Dzubiel 2015

WITH THANKS TO

Andrew Purvis

Kathryn Joergensen

Sylvia Tuz Photography

Mark Leaver

Wendy & Peter Dzubiel

The art shop Mona vale

www.theartshopmonavale.com

Arcadia – selected preview of exhibition 1-11 April 2015 @ SHEFFER GALLERY 38 Lander Street, Darlington, 2008, Sydney

Arcadia This exhibition of paintings seeks to re-imagine the idea of Arcadia in the Australian landscape.  Arcadia is a term derived from the Ancient Greek conception of paradise or place of rustic beauty. The phrase, ‘Et in Arcadia Ego’, roughly translates as meaning – Even in Arcadia, there am I. However, even in paradise, behind the beautiful and the inspiring can be tragedy or the deeply unsettling. This notion befits the vast and isolating beauty of the Australian landscape that has beguiled and transfixed many to dream and explore its shores and plains. The paintings make direct reference to narratives that focus on the notion of being ‘lost’ either to a place or by misadventure.  Peter Weir’s adaptation of Picnic at Hanging Rock and The Audrey’s song, Little Molly, have been the basis for many of the paintings and influenced the direction of the series. Both references have a psychological connection to landscape and conjure imagery of people ‘lost’, whether in a physical or emotional sense, in a place of beauty within the Australian Landscape. The River, which features strongly in this series, can both intrigue and transfix in its transience and in turn, it is this pull that has led the river to be the setting for many narratives. Peta Dzubiel 2015

Solo Exhibition – Peta Dzubiel ARCADIA 1-11 April 2015 @ Sheffer Gallery 38 Lander Street, Darlington, 2008

doubleinviteRGB ARCADIA PETA DZUBIEL Opening April 1 Wednesday 6 – 8pm 2015 Sheffer Gallery 38 Lander St Darlington 2008 Exhibition runs April 1-11, Wednesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm

This exhibition of paintings seeks to re-imagine the idea of Arcadia in the Australian landscape. Arcadia is a term derived from the Ancient Greek conception of paradise or place of rustic beauty. The phrase, ‘Et in Arcadia Ego’, roughly translates as meaning – Even in Arcadia, there am I. However, even in paradise, behind the beautiful and the inspiring can be tragedy or the deeply unsettling. This notion befits the vast and isolating beauty of the Australian landscape that has beguiled and transfixed many to dream and explore its shores and plains. The paintings make direct reference to narratives that focus on the notion of being ‘lost’ either to a place or by misadventure. Peter Weir’s adaptation of Picnic at Hanging Rock and The Audrey’s song, Little Molly, have been the basis for many of the paintings and influenced the direction of the series. Both references have a psychological connection to landscape and conjure imagery of people ‘lost’, whether in a physical or emotional sense, in a place of beauty within the Australian Landscape. The River, which features strongly in this series, can both intrigue and transfix in its transience and in turn, it is this pull that has led the river to be the setting for many narratives.

Peta Dzubiel 2015

Inside the Studio

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Inside the Studio

In the studio I have been oscillating between painting landscape and figurative works for a solo exhibition in early April 2015. I am conscious of the work showing all of my ideas, influences and reading, on a visual picture plane. These ideas consist of Arcadia and the Australian landscape, lost children narratives and drowning’s and the Australian Gothic mode, in particular the writing of Gerry Turcotte and his paper,  ‘Australian Gothic’, 1998 which has isolated and described several ideas which influence my practice.

The conceptual has pushed my painting and studio practice in new areas. I am concerned with the paintings being aesthetically appealing yet containing an air of uncertainty, as it is this juxtaposition which can be attributed to the Australian Gothic mode; it is what we experience and have an indirect awareness of in the Australian landscape. Behind the beautiful and the inspiring can be tragedy or the deeply unsettling.

My challenge in the studio and out in the field, is painting these themes of the Shoalhaven River, the bush and the figure in the landscape in a convincing way. However, this is not unenjoyable, completely the opposite in fact.

Earlier this year I was able to travel to Spain and Provence in France where I saw many important Art Galleries and Museums. I kept a sketchbook/journal and am now finding that the works of several artists are having an impact directly and indirectly in the studio.

Below are some pictures of paintings (in progress) and drawings from my sketchbook.

Keeping Company With The Collection at Manly Art Gallery and Museum 8 Nov – 1 Dec 2013

Keeping Company With The Collection is an exhibition of new works by artists from Sydney’s Northern Beaches exhibited alongside a selection of the Manly Art Gallery & Museum collection archives which inspired their work.

Opening Friday 8 November 6-8pm. To be opened by Katherine Roberts Senior Curator MAG&M

Exhibition dates: 8 November – 1 December 2013

Artists in conversation Sunday 24 November, 3-4pm

Recollection, oil on linen on board, 2013

Recollection, oil on linen on board, 55.5 x 61cm, 2013

Abstract by Ralph Balson has been applied to further explore my current work, which looks at the anxiety of the Australian bush through ‘lost children’ narratives. The wonder and intrigue of the Australian bush and landscape lured children to wander further from the safety of their known environment, often to their detriment and peril. The decision to obscure the faces of the children with a broad sweeping brush aims to evoke a sense of loss. Recollection is a direct reaction to the colour palette and gestural marks Balson used to create his painting. I have combined elements of realism and abstraction via Balson’s dynamic paint application and composition to suggest a deeper psychological space.

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Ralph Balsen, Abstract, 1958, oil on composition board 61 x 76cm

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Gunyah artist in residence – North Arm Cove NSW

Have you seen Miranda, oil on primed paper, 2013

Gunyah Residency 13-27 September

For two weeks in September I was lucky to undertake a self directed artist’s residency. The Gunyah house is beautiful and set amongst the bush on a slope that leads to the waters of North Arm Cove, a gentle sheltered cove where a boat could seek refuge from a storm. During my two week residency the weather was all over the place, a sunny warm morning followed by a thunder storm at lunchtime and a calm mild afternoon. Typical Spring with four seasons experienced in one day. Towards the end of September the weather was windy and warm and a high danger for bushfires.

Apart from enjoying the exquisite natural surroundings of Gunyah, I was able to develop and play with some ideas central to the Australian bushland environment and the dense and twisted Gums of North Arm was the perfect place to do this. My focus at Gunyah was to explore the anxiety of the Australian bush through ‘lost children’ narratives. I found myself working with one image of two little girls, painting it several times. When working with images of children, one can often be overtaken by sentimentality. I tried to avoid this by not painting in facial features or by blurring the portrait with a broad gestural sweep.

In the studio and out in the field I favoured painting on primed paper as my support. For one work, I painted two portraits of the same child’s face, one showing facial detail while the other face is blurred and diminished like a fading memory. I wanted to take these dual portraits out of the studio and into the bush, simply to see how they would appear juxtaposed next to the landscape that enticed so many children away from their families and homes to their own detriment and peril. By pinning the paintings to the trees I found I could evoke something that alluded to a memorial or memory, of loss, erasure, missing person’s posters or bush telegraph, something along these lines. I found I could create a multi layered experience with a two dimensional and traditional object, such as, a painting. I took black and white photographs to document this work.

The location of Gunyah and the spring light and colour, one could not help but do a few little landscapes en plein air! I was lucky to have my family and a couple of friends visit me and enjoy together the beautiful property. I enjoyed very much driving into Tea Gardens on occasion and eating and drinking coffee at the Boatshed.  I also enjoyed exploring Mungo Brush, seeing an abundance of flannel flowers and swimming in the aqua waters of Jimmy’s Beach on the hottest day.

A sincere thankyou to Kath Fries and the Gunyah property group that make this wonderful residency available to artists. I found the two weeks very productive and positive for my practice.

Peta Dzubiel, 2013

http://www.gunyah.blogspot.com.au/

Kath Fries: Gunyah artist-in-residence co-ordinator www.kathfries.com