REFLECTION/REFRACTION 13-24 July 2016 Peta Dzubiel, Cade Turner, Karen Stuart – curated by Rachel Carroll

Light can give you back your history, not only as a thought or memory but as a vital and intense experience…it strongly influences the sentiment with which you experience your reality.

Huisman

This exhibition Reflection/Refraction brings together three Sydney based artists who enhance our memories of reality with light. As the quote suggests, light can greatly influence our experience of a place or event. Each artist touches on certain events that reflect the environmental changes in our atmosphere, oceans and waterways. Each artist highlights the nature of an everyday experience; a lake, the ocean floor and cloud formations, but they are asking us to question these surrounds from an environmental perspective. Each artist is dedicated to their chosen media – painting, photography and ceramics. – Rachel Carroll 2016

Peta Dzubiel – Painting    http://www.petadzubiel.com

Cade Turner – Photography    http://www.cadeturner.com.au

Karen Stuart – Ceramics    bluerecycled@hotmail.com

WITH THANKS TO

Rachel Carroll

Northern Beaches Council

Warringah Creative Space

REFLECTION/REFRACTION essay and selected preview of work

 

Light can give you back your history, not only as a thought or memory but as a vital and intense experience…it strongly influences the sentiment with which you experience your reality.

Huisman

This exhibition Reflection/Refraction brings together three Sydney based artists who enhance our memories of reality with light. As the quote suggests, light can greatly influence our experience of a place or event. Each artist touches on certain events that reflect the environmental changes in our atmosphere, oceans and waterways. Each artist highlights the nature of an everyday experience; a lake, the ocean floor and cloud formations, but they are asking us to question these surrounds from an environmental perspective.

Cade Turner’s black and white photographs of clouds titled Cielo allow the light to enhance form and movement, while his photo series titled Away explores a nostalgic relationship with nature in a soft and hazy light. Peta Dzubiel paints lush oils of lakes titled Arcadia, where the fading light is reflected by the water surface. Peta’s new figurative work harks back to a time when nature was experienced at a distance or as something to conquer. While the detailed ceramics by Karen Stuart engage present concerns for coral bleaching. The light filled coral ceramics are enhanced by a subtle use of colour, the series is titled SEA. Each artist, independent of each other, has explored the variety of light found in each location.

Burke was the first philosopher to argue that the sublime and the beautiful are mutually exclusive. (1756)

Each location has a story that intermingles a Romantic and impressionistic visual language. Historically Romantic Artists were concerned with the power of nature and the sublime experience it provided. Here each artist is providing a sublime experience but one that is not about nature’s power but instead they highlight the beauty and greatness of nature’s liquid paths. The impressionistic light reflected in each artwork reveals a considered observation of a glow or the movement of time and it allows the immersive experience to take hold.

Delicate seaweed and coral evokes memories of the ocean floor. Are these Ceramics of coral that are globally warmed and bleached? Photograph’s of the light bouncing off a cloud quickly establishing a sense of form. Is this our atmosphere, how clean is it and how warm is it? Numerous questions are provoked by these artworks often with an underlying concern for the environment. The figurative work by both Cade and Peta intertwines place and time with a sense of nostalgia. Are these relationships with nature from the past or are they relationships we should be focusing on now? Both artist’s work using two very different mediums, one the camera and the other oil paint and yet the vision they both share reflects one of atmospheric deliberation. In each view you are drawn to colour, movement and the subtle form, but you are left to draw your own conclusions, what is actually going to happen, what has happened or what just is.

 
In today’s climate eco-criticism is leading the way offering new ways to examine our concerns and relationships with nature, equally art is taking a lead by providing a pedagogical experience to inspire us to engage with nature. Each artist invites us to observe the light and the details that are a reminder of what is and what will hopefully remain. If we all learn something from the experience of viewing these artworks, if we can view nature in a new light and seek a new relationship with nature then these artworks have been prodigious.
Rachel Carroll

rc_artist@hotmail.com

 

Cade Turner:  cadeturner.com.au

Karen Stuart: bluerecycled@hotmail.com

Peta Dzubiel:  petadzubiel.com

 

Arcadia – selected preview of exhibition 1-11 April 2015 @ SHEFFER GALLERY 38 Lander Street, Darlington, 2008, Sydney

Arcadia This exhibition of paintings seeks to re-imagine the idea of Arcadia in the Australian landscape.  Arcadia is a term derived from the Ancient Greek conception of paradise or place of rustic beauty. The phrase, ‘Et in Arcadia Ego’, roughly translates as meaning – Even in Arcadia, there am I. However, even in paradise, behind the beautiful and the inspiring can be tragedy or the deeply unsettling. This notion befits the vast and isolating beauty of the Australian landscape that has beguiled and transfixed many to dream and explore its shores and plains. The paintings make direct reference to narratives that focus on the notion of being ‘lost’ either to a place or by misadventure.  Peter Weir’s adaptation of Picnic at Hanging Rock and The Audrey’s song, Little Molly, have been the basis for many of the paintings and influenced the direction of the series. Both references have a psychological connection to landscape and conjure imagery of people ‘lost’, whether in a physical or emotional sense, in a place of beauty within the Australian Landscape. The River, which features strongly in this series, can both intrigue and transfix in its transience and in turn, it is this pull that has led the river to be the setting for many narratives. Peta Dzubiel 2015

Inside the Studio

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Inside the Studio

In the studio I have been oscillating between painting landscape and figurative works for a solo exhibition in early April 2015. I am conscious of the work showing all of my ideas, influences and reading, on a visual picture plane. These ideas consist of Arcadia and the Australian landscape, lost children narratives and drowning’s and the Australian Gothic mode, in particular the writing of Gerry Turcotte and his paper,  ‘Australian Gothic’, 1998 which has isolated and described several ideas which influence my practice.

The conceptual has pushed my painting and studio practice in new areas. I am concerned with the paintings being aesthetically appealing yet containing an air of uncertainty, as it is this juxtaposition which can be attributed to the Australian Gothic mode; it is what we experience and have an indirect awareness of in the Australian landscape. Behind the beautiful and the inspiring can be tragedy or the deeply unsettling.

My challenge in the studio and out in the field, is painting these themes of the Shoalhaven River, the bush and the figure in the landscape in a convincing way. However, this is not unenjoyable, completely the opposite in fact.

Earlier this year I was able to travel to Spain and Provence in France where I saw many important Art Galleries and Museums. I kept a sketchbook/journal and am now finding that the works of several artists are having an impact directly and indirectly in the studio.

Below are some pictures of paintings (in progress) and drawings from my sketchbook.